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T-SQL Tuesday: My favorite Bug


Heyo –

Haven’t written a T-SQL Tuesday post in a long time – but this one sounded like fun, so here we go.

tsql2sday150x150

A number of years ago, when SQL 2005 came out – I have to admit, I didn’t like it at all.  At the time, there were no trackpads in our department, and a lot of the simple keyboard functionality I’d gotten used to from SQL 7 and sql 2000 were just gone.  We joked that you could take down an entire database department by walking around to people’s desks at lunchtime and stealing their mice.

It had a lot of bugs in it.  It took me just over 2 minutes after install to find the first one, and I started reporting them.  Daily.  This got to the point where I was sending them so often that one day when I had essentially a catalog of workarounds and didn’t send a bug report, the PM over there sent me a note asking if I was okay.  He was worried because I hadn’t sent in a bug report that day – and I’d been so consistent that – well, it just wasn’t right for him to start his day without the requisite gripe from Tom.

But the biggest gripe of all was how slow the RTM version of 2005 was.  I didn’t understand how an app could be that slow, but it was, and one day I decided to just report the bug the official way, not the usual way, so I went out to the Connect thing, and, being in a less than grumpy mood that day, filed a bug.   Performance related.  Because I just needed something to do.

And darned if it didn’t eventually get closed.

As fixed.

I’m gonna guess you have to turn your speakers up just a bit if you still have a SQL 2005 RTM box around – but it’s fixed… Just ask Buck.  🙂

https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/253524/feature-request-usability-performance-related

 

 

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Posted by on January 10, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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Life Lessons from SQLSaturdayABQ – Including one from Bugs Bunny


SQLSaturdayABQ

So it’s been a couple of weeks – but SQL Saturday ABQ has finally simmered long enough for me to write about it. I learned so much about so many things down there, and am tremendously grateful for the opportunity to share not only a meal and some learning with professional colleagues, but also reconnect with old friends and make new ones.

The trip down was great – I found out that putting my phone into Airplane Mode seemed to put some pretty cool Airplanes into pictures of an already gorgeous landscape.

I learned the Albuquerque is at 5,000 feet, and for someone used to living at sea level, I learned to appreciate the simple things in life, like, say, air.

(On our second day there the wonderful friend we were staying with took us up to the Sandia Peak Tramway. She and my wife enjoyed the gift shop at the lower elevations while I, still getting used to the 5,000 foot elevation,  went up another 5000 feet on the tram.

No, no oxygen masks fell out of the sky, but I could definitely feel all 10,378 feet of altitude there.

After I got back down, we explored some more, stopped at some lower elevations, and got a little perspective on the mountains for a little further north,

We stopped in a little town called Bernalillo and saw the Coronado Historic Site (above), and could hear the Rio Grande River gurgling down below. It was so different from what we have here in Washington – one could easily say it’s ugly and brown, but that would be missing the point – it’s got a beauty all its own, and needs to be looked at with different eyes.

As for the sessions with SQL Saturday itself…

I learned things about PowerShell in the session from Mike Fal ( b | t ) that made me want to get my hands dirty and try to find problems we’re struggling with in our environments that could be solved with a little PowerShell, and he proved that yes, you can indeed type in a demo, and then promptly demo’d why not to do it. J I loved the examples he gave, and the fact that he stuck with “learn the concepts, don’t freak about the code” – in large part because, just like in Field of Dreams (if you build it, they will come), with PowerShell, if you learn the concepts, the code will follow. You just have to understand what you want to do first – and that happens with the concepts. I’ve learned that if you give someone a problem first, and then give them a pile of tools, they’ll figure stuff out, and you’ll see creative juices flowing as they start thinking about new ways to solve old problems. It’s kind of fun to watch, and more fun to be part of.

I didn’t take any pictures of Jason Horner’s (b|t) session, but I enjoyed his presentation very much, which was full of demos and examples of databases much bigger than the ones I handle. As I recall, there were 4 (FOUR) MCM’s in the room… We were walking on hallowed ground there – and just that level of conversation, questions, and knowledge was fun to be around. I look forward to seeing more of his presentations, and applying what I learned there.

John Morehouse’s ( b | t ) session on social media had an interesting cross section of people in it – some quite experienced who are used to it, but always looking for new things to learn, and some who were absolutely new to the game and had never, ever used it.

John talked about how it can benefit you professionally, how easy it is to blur the lines between personal and professional, and how to do your best to keep them separate if needed. He made a very valid point that no matter where you are, you’re an ambassador for your company – so “think first, then post” along with the idea that once you hit send, it’s out there. Know your company’s policies on social media. That’s a huge thing. Even if you think it’s a private message, the wrong screenshots in the wrong places can be embarrassing for a long time. We also had a live demo of twitter, and how to do everything from getting a question answered with #sqlhelp, to getting a job via social media.

And I learned a lot – I got better doing my presentation on “Life Lessons in Communication” for the second time – and finally getting the butterflies in my stomach to at least fly in formation. I learned a lot from my audience, and had something totally off script pop into my head during the presentation – with the simple sentence of, “Are you solving the problem? Or managing it?” I realized I learned as much from my own presentation and audience as they did from me. Oh – and lessons are everywhere. You don’t even have to look hard. You just have to pay attention.

It was a lot of fun.

Many, many thanks to Meredith ( b | t ) and crew for getting everything together, and for the absolutely wonderful speaker’s dinner the night before. (what was that smokey salsa-y stuff on the chips? that was amazing!)

What came next was a time that can only be described as a slice of heaven.

Any of you in the IT industry know that the whole work/life balance thing is something that has to be managed very, very deliberately.  The cost of not managing it can be ridiculously high.

And so, for the next few days, I was able to spend that precious thing called time chatting with my wife and our friend, getting incredible amounts of fuzz therapy from two wonderful dogs, and just spending time away from the computer.  I allowed myself the time to absorb some of the lessons I’d learned at SQLSaturdayABQ, and then, as I watched some of the hot air balloons drift by, I realized that not all of the lessons I learned there had to do with SQL… a lot simply had to do with life. Some of them are still simmering, but all of them will end up in a story sooner or later.

Again – thanks to…

…all who attended the presentation (Jason had said I couldn’t start until he was there – I had the pre-presentation butterflies and was quietly hoping for him to be late – but he was there in the front row when I got there – so there was no backing out at all :-) –

…to Avanade for giving me the time off to go do this, and

…to our wonderful friend for sharing her lovely home and hospitality with us, and last but most certainly not least

…to my family for their patience and faith in me as I worked through it.

There are many more lessons out there to be learned, and as I find them, I’ll do my best to share them.

Oh, here’s just one:

You know how Bugs Bunny always says, “I knew I should have taken a left turn at Albuquerque!“?

I now know why he couldn’t do that.  🙂

Take care out there, folks…

Tom

 
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Posted by on March 2, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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Databases and Frat Houses…


I had to explain to a colleague why database autogrow and autoshrink were a bad idea, so I did, he laughed, but got it, and so I went back to my desk and hammered this out – no editing, just hammering…

DATABASES AND FRAT HOUSES

Okay folks, so here’s a basic example of why you want to have your database the right size to start with, and why setting things to “autogrow” and “autoshrink” is a bad idea.

Ready?

Let’s say you go to – oh, say, the Local University, and you live in a frat house with 39 of your closest friends and associates.

Let’s also say that this frat house has parties on a rather regular basis, like, every Friday and Saturday night, and about 100 people show up.

Now if the house is big enough, you set up tables, snacks, “beverages”, and music, and people have a good time, in addition to getting plastered, puking on the lawn and so on – (but that’s outside the house, so we’ll deal with puking on the lawn in another issue.)

So far so good, right?  People have places to congregate, dance, chat, do all that other stuff that happens at frat parties, and so on.  No problem… The house is big enough, might be a little crowded sometimes, might be full of hot, sweaty bodies during the party, but basically, it’s a party, everyone’s having a good time, and no one will remember much of it on Saturday morning.

Except for those guys lying on the front lawn, but again, that’s another story.

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Posted by on April 19, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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